Wednesday 17 October, 2012

UPDATE: World’s Tallest Skyscraper To Be Built…In 210 Days


When we brought you this story back in June, the title read “World’s Tallest Skyscraper To Be Built….in 90 Days! ” 

Well, as any architect knows, first estimates are never accurate. Broad Sustainable Building (BSB), the design firm behind Sky City, soon to be the world’s tallest skyscraper, has professed that the building will now be built at the positively glacial pace of 210 days (7 months instead of 3).

As we explained last time, Sky City will shoot up to its 838-meter (2,750-ft/220-story) height thanks to its pre-fabricated assembly (up to 95% of the materials will be assembled in modular form before on-site construction even begins). BSB also claims that it will be sustainable and earthquake proof.  

According to a fascinating Wired interview with BSB’s founder and Chairman, Zhang Yue (check it out), the foundation is scheduled to be laid in November and should be complete by March 2013. 

Read on after the break for more of Sky City’s impressive record-breaking stats and sustainability chops…

Fast Facts (as Adapted from our Previous Post)

  • If it hits its goal of a 7-month construction period, Sky City will be constructed 9 times faster than the Burj Khalifa, the world’s current tallest building, and be 10 meters (33 feet) taller.
  • Sky City One advertises itself as an earthquake-resistant, carless city which will accommodate approximately 100,000 people and provide retail and leisure facilities.
  • Sky City One has been designed with 15-cm (6-inch) thick exterior walls and a quadruple glazing in order to improve its insulation, allowing it to consume a fifth of the energy of a conventional building its size.
  • The Sky City One will contain 1,000,000 sq m (10,800,000 sq ft) of usable floor space, have 220 floors, and 104 separate elevators.
  • According to CNN, the Sky City One is projected to cost US$628 million. (Compare that to the $1.5 billion Burj Khalifa cost).
  • Work should commence in November 2012 through to the following January, but final approval from Chinese authorities is yet to be granted. 

Story via Curbd and Wired